How To Make Money in College — Without Getting a Job

How To Make Money in College — Without Getting a Job

1. Start a blog

Starting a blog can be an incredible side hustle for college students. It’s why it’s #1 on this list. Think about it. The only thing you need to start a blog is a laptop, web hosting, and a niche to blog about. That’s it.

Starting a blog on top of juggling your college classes, homework, and other responsibilities can be daunting. But it can be done. And of all the side hustles included on this list… this has the most potential to turn into something huge.

I have an entire guide dedicated to starting a successful blog. If you read that guide and take it seriously, there’s no reason you can’t find yourself earning six or seven figures eventually.

Start A Blog Today

What you can expect to earn: How much you can earn blogging will vary a lot. For example, some niches get more traffic than others, therefore giving you more income potential from ad impressions and affiliate links. There are bloggers who make a few thousand a year, $100,000 plus, and even $1,000,000 plus.

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Running Errands

If you have a car or access to good public transportation, consider running errands for people who need extra help. Senior citizens, new moms, and even small business owners will appreciate the helping hand! Find jobs by checking out local message boards on social media and online websites.

Delivery services, such as Postmates, have become popular in the last few years. This offers you a very flexible schedule and most of the time you get to keep 100% of the tips!

39. Become a mystery shopper

Many college students take on this side hustle. It actually has a lot of great benefits. For example, if you are a mystery shopper for restaurants, you can get free food on top of being paid decent money. Goodbye ramen!

The job can also be very flexible, which works out great for your busy college schedule.

MarketForceBecome a mystery shopper and earn. Sign Up

What you can expect to earn: On average, you can make between $5 and $20 per shop or restaurant you visit. Some people have made as much as $14,000 in a year as a mystery shopper part-time. Making Sense of Cents has a good article on how to become a mystery shopper if you want to learn more.

35. Clean Houses or Office Space

Organize pantries, sweep floors, clean pools, and wash windows — armed with just cleaning products and a little bit of elbow grease you’ll be able to take home some money doing simple chores for homeowners or office managers. 

29. Find a Student to Take Notes for

Did you know that there’s a market for note takers? There are universities that assist students with disabilities by pairing them with people that can take down lecture notes for them. Otherwise, consider selling your well-crafted notes to classmates or other interested takers.

Become a Translator

Are you majoring in a foreign language? Start making money as a translator even before you earn your degree. Many businesses, schools, and other organizations often need help translating content from English to other languages. Inquire at your college or local public schools to see whether your services might be needed. You can translate written materials or act as a verbal translator to help foreign guests at special events.

Medical

A more accurate title for this section would be “s

A more accurate title for this section would be “selling your body,” since not all of these cases are strictly related to medicine. But that seemed like it would give the wrong idea.

Here are some ways to make money selling parts or byproducts of something everybody has (unless you’re a ghost reading this, in which case I apologize).

94. Sell Plasma

This is the classic college kid gig, but it’s perfectly legitimate. You go to a local center (research it online first to make sure it’s not sketchy) and spend anywhere from 90 minutes to 2 hours as your blood is drawn from your body.

The blood is filtered to remove red blood cells and other cellular components. The company keeps the plasma, and they return what they’ve filtered out to your body along with a sterile saline solution.

You won’t get rich doing it, but as long as you’re in good health, you’re probably eligible.

95. Sell Hair

If selling your blood plasma seems too painful and creepy, then you can sell your hair (okay, it’s still a bit creepy, but no needles involved). Companies that make wigs out of human hair will pay for your locks, though the requirements are often pretty strict (no dyed hair and certain hair colors are preferred).

Don’t have any experience with this, but HairSellOn looks like a good place to start.

96. Sell Sperm or Eggs

Yes, you really can make money doing this. Sperm and eggs are needed for research purposes, as well as for fertility clinics. Selling either will be uncomfortable or even painful, but you can make serious money in certain cases (especially for egg donations). Note that requirements tend to be pretty strict (you can’t be infertile, for example). Learn more about sperm donation here and egg donation here.

(Note that we don’t have any experience or affiliation with these companies. Always do your own diligent research before selling parts of your body).

97. Sell Your Poop

Yep, we went there. I know it sounds hard to believe, but some people will pay for your poop. The uses include research on the human microbiome and treatment of C. diff infections, which can be cured using a stool transplant in extreme cases. To learn more, visit .

98. Be a Standardized Patient

If your university has a medical school, you could have the chance to make money portraying medical conditions for med students to practice identifying. Essentially, you’re a human practice patient. Don’t worry, no one is going to be performing surgery on you.

Generally, you just have to sit in a room and describe symptoms you have while a succession of medical students interviews you. It’s not the most exciting job (and can be a little awkward depending on the nature of the condition you’re portraying). But it pays. Visit your university’s medical school website (or the website of a local med school) to learn more.

Jobs You Can Do on Your Feet

Two birds, one stone. Earn extra cash and enjoy some exercise in between your class schedule. These side gigs are ideal for the student who needs the money and a quick break from the grind:

Try Dog Walking

Forecasters predict there will be more dogs than people in America by 2025. OK, that’s not true, but dogs are everywhere nowadays. Those furry friends of ours need to stretch their legs, and owners who work long days are willing to pay dog walkers for a bit of midday exercise. Advertise your services by word of mouth or enlist with companies such as Wag! and Rover, both of which find clients for you. If you live off-campus, you might also consider pet-sitting.

Help People Stay in Shape

If you’re a fitness junkie who wants to help others get in shape, consider becoming a personal trainer at your campus rec center or local gym. Many people need the motivation and guidance of a trainer to maximize their workouts.

Take Stock Photos

Do you have a good camera and an eye for photography? See if you can get your work posted on sites such as iStock and Shutterstock, which offer up to 50% of the price tag when they sell your stock photos.

Clean Houses

Particularly in big college towns and cities, students could have ample opportunity to find cleaning work nearby. Tools are cheap, the labor is straightforward, and unlike working for campus custodial services, the profits are all yours.

Make the Move

As with walking dogs, helping people move is a nice way to get in your exercise and make a few bucks while you’re at it. Many moving companies hire college students for busy periods, and there’s something special about an honest day’s work of lifting and lugging.

School-Related Work

The best ways to make money may be right on campus – you just have to know where to look. A college is a business organization, and all organizations have jobs that need to be filled. And even apart from formal jobs, there may be opportunities to make some extra cash just helping out where there are specific needs.

Take a Job at School

Your college or university needs people to fill all kinds of jobs. It could be working in the cafeteria, providing cleaning services, maintaining the grounds, or any one of a number of jobs. It would have the advantage of keeping you on campus for work, rather than needing to go to a remote site.

Check with your school’s human resources department, or even get information from people who are already in those jobs. They can probably point you toward the person who does the hiring.

Tutor Other Students

Do you have a specific subject or two where you’re particularly strong? If so, you may be able to earn money tutoring other students who aren’t.

There are two ways you can approach this. You can see if there’s a formal tutoring program set up on campus. If so, you can sign up and get assignments as they come in.

But a more lucrative opportunity may be to offer your services directly to other students. You can do this by word-of-mouth, but it may be better to advertise your services in the campus newspaper, website or Facebook page. As an independent, you can easily make $25 to $50 per hour, particularly if your specializations are in more technical subjects, like math, science, and computer science.

Use Your Specializations to Help Other Students

You probably have certain skills many others don’t. For example, if you’re really good at designing presentations or providing graphic arts, you may be able to help other students with term papers and projects for a fee. If you’re fluid with computers, you may also be able to teach or troubleshoot the technology for other students.

Advertise your services in the school newspaper, website, or Facebook page. You can also market your services through your own social media. If you start getting referrals from existing customers, you’ll have plenty of income to keep your bank account full throughout your time at school.

Assist a Professor or Department Head

A professor or department head has all kinds of tasks that need to be performed. That includes everything from making copies, to creating audiovisual aids, or doing research.

Check with your professors and with the head of your major department and see what kind of opportunities there are. But also check any online school related media where faculty or administrators might be looking for people to perform certain tasks.

Help Out in the Athletic Department

You’re probably familiar with the concept of a bat boy/girl. But virtually all sports organizations have a need for a bat boy/girl equivalent, or even several. Maybe you’re not playing in any sports in college, but if you played in one or more sports in high school, you can become an equipment manager, or assist the coaching staff in some capacity.

Check with the athletic department or directly with specific teams to see what’s available. And while football and basketball may be the big money making sports in college, there are dozens of other less known teams at your school where fewer students will be signing up to help. Those might be your best opportunities.

2. Start a blog or vlog

Use your personality to make the big bucks. Start a blog, podcast or YouTube channel and begin creating content. There are a lot of different ways to hit the ground earning — check out these starter ideas.

5. Help people with their task list

Get paid to do the stuff that other people don’t want to do. Try a service like TaskRabbit, a site where you can offer up a wide array of services for hire. Jobs include things from yard maintenance and furniture assembly to cooking and waiting in line for people (really).  

Sell Your Old Stuff

You probably have all kinds of crap just lying aro

You probably have all kinds of crap just lying around that you don’t even use. Why not clear out some space in your room or apartment while also making some extra cash? Below are a few of our favorite ways to make money selling stuff you don’t need or use.

85. Poshmark

Have fashionable clothing that you don’t wear? Sell it on Poshmark. Poshmark is an app that connects buyers looking for great deals on quality clothing with people who want to sell it. While the app markets itself toward women, you can also use the app to buy and sell men’s clothing.

86. Yard Sales

Yard sales are a time-honored way of selling the stuff you don’t need, all while meeting some interesting characters (if your yard sales are anything like the ones I’ve been part of).

If you live in a dorm or apartment and don’t have a yard, you can sign up to be part of a larger yard sale at a community center or church (or just ask a homeowner you know if they’d be willing to let you use their yard in exchange for selling some of their stuff).

87. Plato’s Closet

This is another option for selling clothes that you don’t want. Unlike Poshmark, Plato’s Closet has physical stores where you sell your clothes on consignment. The clothing you can sell is “gently used clothing for teens and twenty-something boys and girls.” Visit the company’s website to find a local store.

88. Sell Your Textbooks

As a College Info Geek reader, we know you didn’t pay much for your books because you followed our guide to finding cheap textbooks. Still, you might as well make some money selling these books back to the campus bookstore or even to Amazon.

As much as you might think you’ll crack open that calculus textbook 20 years from now, it’s unlikely (you can just look it up on the internet, anyway).

Off-Campus Jobs for College Students

10. Work in a cafe or restaurant

There might be a lot of cafes or restaurants near campus that hire part-time employees for positions like chefs or servers. These jobs can hourly wages, tip-based, or a combination of both.

11. Become a driver for a rideshare company

If you have a reliable car, it’s easy to pick up driving jobs through sites like Uber and Lyft to make extra money in college. Typically, you’ll work as an independent contractor and have the freedom to set your schedule. Plus, you can pick up extra hours on evenings and weekends when you’re not in class.

Tip: You will likely need proof of car insurance to get started. You’ll also need to report your earnings during annual tax time.

12. Deliver food and groceries

Food delivery is another job that’s gained popularity with the appearance of apps like Uber Eats, DoorDash, Postmates, and grocery delivery services with Instacart and Amazon. You can easily sign up to work for these services online and choose your schedule as you go.

13. Work as a store associate

Stores selling goods and clothing usually will hire part-time store associates to keep the store clean, stocked, and cashiers readily available. If you have a brand that you are passionate about, consider applying for positions there.

14. Tutor in your native language

Ever thought about tutoring in your native language? You can easily turn this talent into a part-time job. Many language learners are looking for native speakers who can tutor the language and the culture. Don’t speak another language other than English? You can tutor English, too.

15. Get an internship

Consider doing an internship while you are still in school. Depending on the company that you work for, you can get paid for during internship. An internship is also a great way for you to build up your resume and gain work experience, which will enable you to have a competitive advantage when graduating from college and entering the workforce. Internships sometimes can also lead to permanent positions post-graduation.

16. Get a temp job

Check with local employment agencies for temp jobs. Agencies will help you find temporary part-time jobs like administrative work (such as answering phones or data entry) or customer service tasks. You can also pick up freelance work as a writer to make extra cash while in college.

Tip: Ask if the staffing agency takes out taxes from your check or if that’s something you need to pay to the state and federal government yourself during tax season. Some agencies also offer benefits if you work over a certain number of hours per week.

Creative Ways to Make Money in College

You probably won’t make a fortune on these ideas, but you can bring in some extra spending money while flexing your creative muscles.

14. Flip items for a profit

View this post on Instagram A post shared by Whitney Hansen | Money Coach (@whitney_hansen_co) on Apr 14, 2020 at 11:50am PDT

If you love to find great deals on clothing, accessories, electronics, and other goods, flipping may be a fun way for you to make money in college. I have a friend who started a furniture flipping side hustle in college and still enjoys it as a nice side income today.

To find items you can flip for a profit, visit garage sales, discount stores, and consignment shops in your area. It takes practice to know what types of items are undervalued. Depending on what items you flip, you may need to learn a new skill in order to turn a profit on your purchases.

For example, you can often find used furniture at a good price on sites like Craigslist or Facebook Marketplace. With a little sanding, some paint, and a nice finish, you could turn an old wooden table into a beautiful new kitchen statement piece.

This side hustle is especially suitable for interior design majors or anyone who’s crafty or wants to learn new handyperson skills.

15. Design and sell T-shirts (or leggings, phone cases, backpacks, and more)

In the past, if you wanted to sell T-shirts, you would’ve had to create the design, find a printer, have them printed, advertise them, and deal with the hassle of fulfilling orders. Now there are websites like Teespring that do all the back-end work for you, so all you have to do is create a design and choose your selling price.

With Teespring, you use its software to create a design. Once you’re finished, Teespring will tell you the base cost for your product. You choose how much profit you want to make on each item, which determines the selling price.

Teespring offers marketing tools to help you make sales, but you can boost your earnings in a couple ways:

  1. Be creative with your design. Choose something that appeals to a specific person. For example, you can make funny T-shirts that only people in your major would relate to.
  2. Do your own advertising. Share your designs with friends and family on social media. If you have a following online (Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, TikTok, a blog, etc.), then share with your audience.

When someone buys your design, Teespring takes care of order fulfillment and customer service. You can request your payout within 24 to 48 hours after your order is sent to the buyer.

16. Edit or proofread papers

English, communications, or journalism majors may be especially well suited for this college side hustle. However, all you really need is solid grammar and writing skills.

If you or any of your friends are in a major that requires a lot of writing, start spreading the word around about your editing and proofreading services. Editing isn’t the same thing as rewriting. Make it clear that you’re offering feedback and notes, but you won’t be writing other people’s papers for them.

17. Offer resume coaching

When I was in college, I worked for the office for student affairs. One of the perks of my job was that the department would host free resume and career workshops for student employees. I attended a few and got really good at putting together resumes.

I offered to help some of my friends with their resumes for job applications, but I missed out on a prime opportunity to make money in college by offering paid resume coaching services to more people. If you’ve done your research and have the skills to put together a resume that wows potential employers, then don’t squander your gift like I did.

You can find clients by posting in school-related Facebook groups or hanging fliers in dining halls. But for a service like this, word of mouth can be the most powerful marketing.

Tell your friends to tell their friends that you’re helping people with resumes. With everyone applying for jobs and summer internships, spring is likely to be your busiest time of year. However, this side hustle has the potential to bring in a solid income year-round.

18. Sell your photos

Unless you’re a cinema or photography major, then selling photos might not sound like much of a resume builder. However, employers like to see hobbies and interests on your resume, especially for undergraduates. It can also give you some good talking points for your interview.

As long as you have a smartphone with a high-quality camera, you can start this side hustle without investing in any expensive equipment. If you want, you can order lenses for your phone on Amazon for less than $100. Practice taking pictures of landscapes, people (with their permission), or buildings.

Then submit them to one of the many sites that pay for original photography, like Shutterstock or Getty Images. You can also turn your images into art and sell them on Etsy. This probably won’t be your biggest money maker, but it can be a fun way to monetize an existing hobby.

19. Start a YouTube channel

Similar to blogging, making money with a YouTube channel isn’t typically a quick thing. You’ll need to create and publish videos consistently. But if you’re a cinematography or video production major, then creating YouTube videos could be a great way to practice your craft.

Eight-year-old Ryan Kaji, whose channel Ryan’s World has 22.9 million subscribers, earned $26 million in 2019 — up $4 million from his earnings in 2018, when he also gained the highest-earning YouTuber spot

— CNN Business (@CNNBusiness) December 26, 2019

In order to make money with this side hustle, you’ll need to do your research on hashtags and how to optimize your videos for search so people find them organically. Once you have enough views and followers, you can start monetizing your channel with ads.

Other monetization options are similar to blogging: add affiliate links to your video descriptions, create and sell your own products, or reach out to companies to see if they’d like to sponsor your content for a mention in your videos.

Related: 13 Legit Online Jobs for College Students

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Other Great Part-TimeJobs for College Students

In addition to the above, there is a slew of tried-and-true side gigs you can always turn to, including:

Bartending or Waiting Tables

There’s no shame in the part-time service job. Depending on where you’re located, there can be serious cash (and fun) to be had with these jobs, and most offer flexible scheduling so you can make it to classes with no problem.

Painting Houses

A little fresh air, some good old-fashioned manual labor, and a decent wage. Many house-painting companies, such as College Pro House Painters, make a point of hiring students who need extra cash and have no previous experience.

Lifeguarding

Many high school students earn their first paychecks working as lifeguards in the summer months. It’s still a great option for students in college who are, of course, proficient swimmers and enjoy sitting poolside ensuring everybody stays safe.

Landscaping

Lawns need to be mowed and trees need to be trimmed. Why can’t you be the one to do the mowing and the trimming? If you like working outside with your hands and love the smell of freshly cut grass, find the nearest landscaping company on the hunt for good workers.

Shoveling Snow

Students in northern states don’t need to be reminded that opportunities abound to shovel sidewalks and front steps in the winter months. You could volunteer to do your neighbor’s walk for free (which is a nice thing), or you could offer up your services to anyone on the block for a small fee.

Babysitting

Although many college campuses offer daycare to staff and administration, some do not. See if your professors ever need a hand watching the kids while they’re in class or target local families by posting an ad online.

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