How to Calculate Square Footage in Your Facility, the Easy Way

How to Calculate Square Footage in Your Facility, the Easy Way

About This Calculator:

Our Square Footage Calculator / SQFT calculator helps you calculate the area required for roofing shingles, landscaping for a garden, tiling, flooring space, carpeting and wallpaper. There is even a Siding Square Footage Calculator so you can estimate House Siding costs without any hassle.

We have covered most common use cases. Our calculator allows you to input length and width in many units, such as yards (yds), meters (m), millimeters (mm), centimeters (cm) and inches (in).

It automatically converts your input into feet and also provides output multiple units:

  • – Square Footage (ft2)
  • – Square Yards (yd2)
  • – Square Meters (m2)
  • – Acres (acre)

We also have price or cost input which completely optional but allows you to calculate the cost of materials such as plywood, aluminium, paint and labor cost (Most contractors use price per square foot when calculating their labor cost).

Video

How To Measure Square Footage Of A House In 3 Steps

To calculate the square feet of a house, you will need to determine each room’s area and add it together. It sounds easy, right? We’re going to try to keep it that way as we walk you through the process. Gather a few tools before getting started:

  1. Tape Measure

  2. Notepad and pen/pencil

  3. Calculator

You may also want someone to assist as you measure, especially in larger rooms. While it all depends on the shape of your house and the complexity of your floor plan, sometimes it’s a good idea to start this endeavor with a helping hand. When you are ready to get started, there are three steps to follow:

  • Measure the length and width of each room and hallway in your house.

  • Multiply the length and width of each room separately, which you can write down before your final calculations.

  • When you are done measuring and multiplying, add the area of each room together.

Square Footage Of A House Example

For example, pretend you live in a ranch home in the shape of a rectangle. The length of the house is 70 feet, and the width is 50. This means to calculate the square footage, you will multiply 70 by 50, resulting in a final calculation of 3,500 square feet. Of course, not every home is a perfect rectangle — making it more time-consuming to get accurate numbers. That’s why going room by room is often the most practical method. With the proper measurements and some addition, you can still calculate the square footage of your home.

Ask The Pros

Learning how to calculate the square feet of a house can be a challenging task. Thankfully, there are experts to help you. It is common practice to hire a professional appraiser to accurately measure your home. Depending on the property’s size, the cost of an appraiser to measure the square footage can range from $100 to several hundred dollars. When an appraiser calculates the square feet of a house, they also only include areas that are heated and cooled. While two different appraisers will sometimes have different measurements on square footage, there is usually only a 1-3% variance. Appraisers will do their best to calculate square footage with scientific accuracy.

2. What is Net Square Feet?

Net Square Feet (“NSF”) is like gross square feet,

Net Square Feet (“NSF”) is like gross square feet, minus space that is inaccessible to people. In other words, NSF would include areas that people can walk into, like offices, classrooms, hallways, stairwells and closets. NSF would not include space that is taken up by walls, or mechanical chases that are closed off between walls or floors.

NSF is a great metric to use when determining circulation, capital planning for renovations and mechanical area locations. NSF isn’t readily available in most facilities and can be difficult and time consuming to collect. This usually turns facility managers away from assigning someone to measure it out. The introduction of space management software can help alleviate this issue and accomplish accurate measurements much faster.

How to Calculate Net Square Feet

Take your building’s gross square footage minus square footage of inaccessible spaces (like wall space and mechanical areas etc.) This metric equals your net square feet. You could also calculate net square feet by summing up the area of every room in your facility.

How to calculate how many pieces of bullnose you will need?

If you have ten feet exposed edge that needs bullnose this is equal to 120″.  If you selected a 6″ bullnose or trim piece, you will need to divide 120″ by 6″, which will give you 20 pieces of bullnose needed.  Using 8″ decorative liner for the same 120″, you divide 120″ by 8″ which would be 15 pieces of liner needed.

How to find the square footage of a circle

  1. Measure the diameter of your circle in feet.
  2. Divide your diameter by 2 and then square it (multiply it by itself).
  3. Multiply your total by π (3.14159265)
 The formula for calculating the area of a circle

The formula for calculating the area of a circle is: π r2 (with r being the radius of the circle, which is half the diameter). π is the symbol for pi (3.14159265).

 

How to Find Square Footage: Measuring the Room

After countless hours of going back and forth between the Ambient® samples you ordered (and maybe sending out too many “which one do you like better?” texts to friends and family), you’ve FINALLY made your decision. You’ve found the perfect floor and – before you decide to change your mind for the tenth time – there’s only one thing left to do: determine how much square footage you need to order. To figure that out, it may or may not involve your least favorite school subject. Want to take any guesses? That’s right, it’s math! I can tell you can hardly contain your excitement, so let’s jump right into figuring out how much flooring you’ll need to purchase.

What to leave out

A good rule of thumb to ensure you’re taking proper measurements is to exclude space you can’t walk on or live in. These types of spaces do not count as “gross living area.”

“Someone might think, ‘If I get the measurement of my first floor and I have a two-story house, I just multiply that by two,’” Day says. However, if that first floor includes a two-story foyer, you can’t count the non-usable space.

Basements and garages, even if they are finished, don’t generally count toward total square footage. Basements are typically excluded because they are built below grade, meaning below ground level. If your state does allow basements to be included in the total square footage of a home, though, you’ll likely need an ingress and egress, or a safe way to enter and exit the basement to the outside.

Finished attic spaces — with some regulations, including ceiling heights — can count toward the total square footage of your home. If you are planning to sell your home, work with a real estate agent to craft a listing that accurately reflects your property.

Convert among square inch, square foot, square yard and square meter

You could, for example, perform all of your measurements in inches or centimeters, calculate area in square inches or square centimeters then convert your final answer to the unit you need such as square feet or square meters.

To convert among square feet, yards and meters use the following conversion factors.  For other units use our calculator for area conversions.

  • Square Feet to Square Yards
    • multiply ft2 by 0.11111 to get yd2
  • Square Feet to Square Meters
    • multiply ft2 by 0.092903 to get m2
  • Square Yards to Square Feet
    • multiply yd2 by 9 to get ft2
  • Square Yards to Square Meters
    • multiply yd2 by 0.836127 to get m2
  • Square Meters to Square Feet
    • multiply m2 by 10.7639 to get ft2
  • Square Meters to Square Yards
    • multiply m2 by 1.19599 to get yd2

How many square feet is a 12×12 room?

The square footage of a room measuring 12 feet wide by 12 feet long is 144 square feet. To calculate this you simply multiply the width by the height. 12ft × 12ft = 144 sq ft.

How much to allow for waste?

To allow for waste, you must consider the installation.  For most standard installations, 10% extra for waste is sufficient.  Percentage of waste for more elaborate patterns like running tile on a 45 degree angle, herringbone or cross hatch, consult with your installer. Add 15% for tile being installed in a room with lots of jogs and corners. These installations will require more cuts and thus more waste.

Length x Width + Waste = Amount Needed

Why are these square footage definitions important?

Square footage measurements and definitions inform important tasks in your facility. If you don’t have the right information, you could be overspending, under-allocating work hours or putting yourself at risk when undergoing audits. When you collect the correct data, you reduce the chance of these problems occurring. From creating cleaning schedules to writing grants, knowing square footage metrics will speed up your processes and improve the quality of your work. The sooner you can start calculating, the better.

Need help collecting your facility’s space data?

If you’re low on time or need assistance collecting or calculating accurate square footage, contact a professional who can do the work for you. AkitaBox will verify your space and asset data using cutting-edge technology, then deliver accurate, up-to-date floor plans your department can actually use in under 90 days. Schedule time to speak with an AkitaBox team member today, or click here to view a video demonstration of AkitaBox software capabilities. We’re here to help!

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